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Lesson 18: M.N.E.M.O.N.I.C.S.

A mnemonic device is a technique that consolidates a lot of information into a kind of code that stimulates recall of the information. A mnemonic can take some effort to create, but once it's made and memorized, students have a nearly foolproof and long term means of recalling the information. It's an useful study skill -- particularly for remembering lists and sequences. Review previous lesson slides Continue to next lesson slides Continue reading

Lesson 17: The Hidden Benefits of Outlining Your Textbook

Chapter outlining is an easy and effective way students can improve their comprehension and retention of content. Outlining condenses large amounts of expository information into manageable, bite-sized and logically organized chunks that are easy for Brainy to digest. Chapter outlines also make great study guides. Review previous lesson slides Continue next lesson slides Continue reading

Lesson 16: Cornies and Indies and Hybrids, Oh My!

The Cornell note-taking system is a popular method for taking notes in class. It's been around for about 60 years and millions of students have used this format because it's simple and it works. Cornell notes can be used with all learning styles, in any and all subjects. A series of Cornell notes makes an excellent personalized study guide. Knowing how to take Cornell and other notes increases students' college readiness and can improve academic… Continue reading

Lesson 15: Navigating Notes

Content gets more difficult in high school and college. Classes move faster and teachers' expectations rise. Lectures are longer and packed with information students must remember. There are many obvious and some less obvious but equally important benefits to taking class notes. To succeed in high school and college, students need to take notes in class. Review previous lesson slides Continue to next lesson slides Continue reading

Lesson 14: Hey, Are You Listening?

Much of what students are responsible for learning is delivered through lecture or spoken instructions. In high school and college, lectures will be longer and more complex. Spoken instructions will be quick and concise. Good listening skills are not automatic. Developing good listening skills requires practice and discipline. Students learn strategies for being active listeners to improve academic performance and college readiness. Review previous lesson slides Continue to next lesson slides Continue reading

Lesson 13: Battle Plan: SQ3R

Studies show that when students simply open their textbook and begin reading without preparation, they remember less than 30% of what they read by the following week. As students move up into high school and college, academic success depends on their ability to read, comprehend, and recall a great deal of nonfiction text. Good study skills include using special reading strategies like SQ3R to improve the ability to comprehend and remember nonfiction text. Review previous… Continue reading

Lesson 12: Active Learning in a Passive Learning World

A mind that questions, explores and assesses information as it learns, acquires content more deeply and more meaningfully. When the mind searches for and actively constructs an answer, rather than passively accepting the answer handed to it, it learns more deeply and more meaningfully. This is active learning. Students learn strategies for being active learners to improve academic performance and college readiness. Review previous lesson slides Continue to next lesson slides Continue reading

Lesson 11: Gett’n Your Schema On!

Students rarely learn something completely new. Textbooks, lessons, and curriculum are designed to progressively build skills and knowledge. What a student learns today connects to something they learned or studied before. This prior knowledge -- called schema -- is important because it links to and provides context and a neural pathway for new, incoming information. Successful students activate their schemas before learning new information. Review previous lesson slides Continue to next lesson slides Continue reading

Lesson 10: Syllabusted!

The syllabus is one of the most important documents students will receive in a class. It provides valuable insight into how their instructor will run the class, how course content is organized, and what is expected of them. As students move up into high school and college, syllabuses become more complex, detailed and increasingly important to academic success. Students should make a pre-learning habit of carefully and thoroughly reviewing the course syllabus. Review previous lesson… Continue reading

Lesson 9: The Organized Workspace

It's an ergonomic fact that workers' productivity levels increase when workspaces are organized and stocked with the supplies needed to get the job done. It’s no different for students. The space where students study and do homework affects the quality of their work and their ability to manage time. As students move up into high school and college, the increased volume and difficulty of homework will require them to spend more time studying. Having a… Continue reading