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Lesson 8: That’s My Routine And I’m Stick’n To It!

As students move up into high school and college, the volume and difficulty of homework increases and comprises a significant portion of their grade. It's important that students learn how to set the stage for working efficiently and productively. Developing and sticking to a homework routine is an excellent pre-learning strategy which can save students hours of work, not to mention avoid loads of frustration and stress! Review previous lesson slides Continue to next lesson… Continue reading

Lesson 7: There’s More Than One Way To Be Smart!

Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences holds that the traditional notion of intelligence based on an I.Q. test is too limited. Intelligence can be displayed in many ways. Like learning styles, everyone has a dominant intelligence. Students learn that by identifying their dominant intelligence they can make the most of their innate abilities and compensate for academic weaknesses. Review previous lesson slides Continue to next lesson slides Continue reading

Lesson 6: Learning Resources and Multimodal Learning

As students move up into high school and college, they are expected to assume more personal responsibility for their learning. That means knowing how to reach beyond their teacher and textbook for supplemental or tutorial resources to enhance their learning, or help them overcome a learning challenge. Lectures, video tutorials, amazing websites, broadcasts, podcasts, and historical and scientific data and images provide students with immediate access to learning resources. Never give up in the face… Continue reading

Lesson 5: What’s In Style? (VAK!)

Students contemplate whether they process information better in a particular format. Do they learn better by reading words or hearing them? Must they touch and hold an object to understand it? The Learning Style Theory states that everyone's brain is genetically wired to prefer a particular sensory mode for taking in and processing information. Although it is not the exclusive way we learn, our preferred sensory mode influences our ability to comprehend and retain information.… Continue reading

Lesson 4: Mental Throwdown: Intelligence VS Effort

Students with relatively equal abilities can have very different academic outcomes. Why do some students thrive in school, but others struggle? Why do some students enjoy the challenge of learning, yet others do their best to avoid it? Recent studies reveal that a student's belief about the nature of intelligence can have a big impact on their personal academic achievement. Review previous lesson slides Continue to next lesson slides Continue reading

Lesson 3: A Bit About Brainy

Most of us take our brain for granted, going through the day talking, walking, learning, eating, sleeping, practicing sports, or listening to music... We never give a single thought to the amazing organ that does it all for us: Our brain! How does all that stuff you see, smell, hear and feel every day work its way through your skill to become knowledge and memory? Review previous lesson slides Continue to next lesson slides Continue reading

Lesson 2: Metacognition: The Self-Aware Student

Self-awareness is an important trait for students to develop. Successful students are self-aware learners who consciously monitor and focus on their learning as they learn. They don't just go through the motions. They think about their thinking. Thinking about thinking is called metacognition and it's an important study skill. Lesson Slides Review previous lesson slides Continue to next lesson slides Continue reading

Lesson 1: What Are Study Skills

The term "study" skills is a bit misleading. Study skills are not just for studying – like reviewing for a test or quiz. Study skills apply to all aspects of learning. For college and career readiness, how you learn is just as important as what you know! Lesson Slides Continue to next lesson slides Continue reading